Strength Training for Injury Prevention

“An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” -Benjamin Franklin

Life is unpredictable and sometimes in our sports, exercise, and daily life we come out of these unpredictable situations a little bit worse for the wear…

Some folks try to prevent these situations from happening through avoidance, but if you want to have a high quality of life I highly recommend you adopt a strength training program as your physical insurance program. This is certainly a much more proactive approach to mitigating physical injury than hoping for the best.

“If you train hard, you’ll not only be hard, you’ll be hard to beat.” -Herschel Walker

Or if you are an athlete like Robert Griffin III (pictured above) you may want to consider the risk factors of your sport. Robert, aka RG3, came into the NFL and was an instant phenom and fan favorite for his dazzling display of athleticism that was so uncommon in quarterbacks. His jukes, spins, and leaps were no match for the demands professional football places on an athlete and RG3 has spent most of what was once a promising career watching from the sideline, injured.

You see, despite his athleticism, RG3 has not trained in a way that reinforced a fundamental movement pattern. As we look at the series of pictures highlighting the windup before an explosive jump, We see a valgus knee fault where his knees cave in creating a very compromised position for the joints of his lower extremities. Even though not all injuries are preventable, by focusing more on proper technique and exercises that stabilized the knee joint rather than increasing strength and speed RG3 may have avoided some major injuries in his career.

“There are no shortcuts to any place worth going.” -Beverly Sills

So what should a workout look like?
Exercise should replicate natural human movement patterns. The ones we encounter on a day to day basis. Squat, lunge, hinge, push, pull, rotate and walk. Most exercises fall into at least one and sometimes several of these movement patterns. By addressing all of them in our training we not only improve our functional strength but also prepare our bodies for anything life could throw at them.

In one study published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine there was an 88% overall reduction in ACL injury rate in an intervention group of soccer players who participated in an injury prevention program. The right knowledge and a little consistency can go a long way when it comes down to keeping your body healthy.

Is your current training program addressing mobility, recovery, full range of motion, and then total body strength?

If you have suffered from injuries in the past or have concerns with your mobility it is important to address those with your trainer or coach. They will be able to help you by assessing the area of concern and designing a program to help you improve function with goals and checkpoints along the way. It is not always fun, easy, or sexy to do but giving attention to our problem areas will be easier to do the sooner you start.

“I hated every minute of training, but I said, ”Don’t quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion.” -Muhammad Ali

Don’t be the dad who throws out his back building sand castles at the beach. Talk to one of our coaches and we’ll help you tackle your challenge areas today!

5 Reasons to get STRONG

Fitness trends come and go and most fall to the wayside for good reason.

Most programs fail to produce consistent results. It’s a wonder why so many folks stray away from what is tried and true when it comes to exercise programs?

“The rule is: the basics are the basic, and you can’t beat the basics.” -Charles Poliquin

Despite what your goals may be, every individual can benefit from physical resistance training. Not only that, but the health benefits extend far beyond your short term fitness goals. Regardless of why you train, let’s take a look at some of the reasons you should incorporate strength training into your fitness regimen.

1. Training for strength produces results.

Whatever your goals, muscle will help you get there. Some companies in the fitness industry has made a fortune around buzzwords like “tone”, “lift”, and “sculpt.” The problem is there’s no way to measure those loose terms. If you want to change your body composition there is only the ability to gain or lose muscle while simultaneously gaining or losing fat. If you are looking for the most efficient way to do make a change then strength training is your best option.

Strength training, or physical resistance training, can be defined as a type of physical exercise specializing in the use of resistance to induce muscular contraction which builds the strength, anaerobic endurance, and size of skeletal muscles. When you gain muscle you increase your bodies basal metabolism (the amount of calories you burn each day before factoring in physical activity). It’s kind of like putting a bigger engine in a car. The car is capable of moving faster or pulling a heavier load (more muscle), but it also uses more fuel (fat) whether it’s cruising down the freeway or idling in the driveway. Strength training helps us “tone” through this muscle gain/fat loss trade.

2. “You can’t manage what you can’t measure.” -Peter Drucker

Training for strength provides a clear path for success. You can set training goals that are specific, measurable, and produce desired outcomes. A good coach will help you design a plan towards these goals with checkpoints along the way. Your strength training program is a road map to success with clear directions. Sets, reps, and weights lifted safely through the full range of motion are the signals that you’re on track. Many people find that a more detailed plan helps them stay motivated as they experience progress.

3. Age gracefully with more muscle mass.

As we get older strength training is one of the most important things we can do for our health. Physical independence is a key factor in a great quality of life.

A comprehensive study of strength training has been proven to:

  • Improve motor function
  • Lower resting heart rate
  • Increase stamina
  • Prevent sarcopenia (age related muscle loss)
  • Improve bone mineral density
  • Prevent and help rehab injuries

Functional strength training will be an asset in daily life too. From picking up grandchildren or bags of groceries to climbing stairs with confidence.

4. You’ll experience epic brain gains.

Did you know that lifting weights can strengthen your brain just as much as it does your body?
Dr. Yorgi Mavros from the University of Sydney has found that high‐intensity physical resistance training (PRT) results in significant improvements in cognitive function, muscle strength, and aerobic capacity in older adults with mild cognitive impairment. Adults who followed a resistance training routine in addition to cognitive training performed significantly better than control groups on a series of mental tests. A couple key factors to note:

The participants exercised 2x/ week working to at least 80% of their peak strength.
The benefits lasted one year after the exercise prescription had ended.

What does that mean? According to Yorgi, “The stronger people became, the greater the benefit for their brain.” Let that sink in for a minute. You actually grow your brain by training to become stronger! It makes me wonder if Einstein developed his Theory of Relativity in between heavy sets of back squats…

5. Strong moms have healthy babies.

During pregnancy, the question always arises of what does fitness look like for this stage of life? With so much on the line, it’s important to consult with a doctor before beginning any fitness routine. Luckily, there is a tremendous amount to be gained by incorporating a strength training routine under normal circumstances. Resistance training can help alleviate symptoms and improve health outcomes for the mother and child. According to the Mayo Clinic, women who follow a consistent strength training routine during pregnancy can experience:

  • Reduce backaches, constipation, bloating and swelling
  • Boosted mood and energy levels
  • Better sleep
  • Prevent excess weight gain
  • Maintain levels of muscle strength and endurance
  • Reduced incidence of gestational diabetes

Not only that but women who train during pregnancy report enhanced body image and better psychological well-being!

We would love to help you live a healthy strong life. Schedule a Free Consult to learn more.

Jumpin, Jumpin

CrossFit Jacked – CrossFit

Metcon

Metcon (Time)

Burpee Test

1 Minute Time Cap

12 Bar Facing Burpees

–rest 5 minutes before beginning WOD–
This test is performed to help you determine if you are able to complete the RX version of today’s WOD.

If unable to complete the 12 bar facing burpees within 1 minute you will use whatever number of burpees achieved as the buy in for each AMRAP today.

i,e. complete 8 bar facing burpees and you will do 8 bar facing burpees each round before beginning the lunges.

Metcon (AMRAP – Reps)

Jumpin, Jumpin

On a Running Clock @ 0:00

Every 3 mins (30 mins) for 10 Rounds

AMRAP 2:00

12 Bar Facing Burpees

Max Reps Step Back lunge 95/65

Rest 1 Minute

–rest 5 minutes after workout is completed and perform an 800m Run
Interval sprint style workout. Come out of the gate hot on the burpees and move steady with the step back lunges. It will burn and that’s ok just fight to keep the legs moving. When it’s time to run just know that the legs will be fatigue so the first 100m will be all about getting your legs under you.

Front rack or back rack allowed on lunge portion. Keep the legs stepping back and pause at the top of each rep so the legs don’t blow up. Don’t stop moving on step back lunges.

The Scaling aim is for athletes to finish the burpees under 1:00. Weight on lunges should be light and non stop on movement.

800m Run (Time)

Max Effort 800m Run
Please run on pavement (around building) and stay off the grass to prevent tracking dirt into the gym.

If raining hard, sub with 1000m Row.

Be ready for the legs to be shaky on the run. Start off that first 100m feeling the pace out and make the adjustments as you go.

Here We Go Again

CrossFit Jacked – CrossFit

Weightlifting

Clean Deadlift (3 sets of 3 reps @ 103% of Clean in 7 minutes)

Use clean grip and clean position to deadlift the bar

Clean Pull (3 sets of 3 reps @ 95% of Clean in 7 minutes)

Clean and Jerk (3 Singles @ 77% in 6 minutes)

catch in squat

Metcon

Metcon (2 Rounds for reps)

Here We Go Again

2 sets

8min Amrap

1000m/800m Row or 50/36 Bike Buy In

– Into –

2-4-6-8-10. . .

Dumbbell Box Step Up

M- 50s/24’’

F-35s/20’’

Push Ups

– rest 2:00 b/t sets –
You will hold a dumbbell in each hand for this workout on the box step ups.

Dumbbells should remain by your side and not placed on your shoulders.

If short on dumbbells, use kettlebells.

2nd heat will begin at 5 minute mark.

You will score each round for stepups and pushups completed.

Gettin’ Started

CrossFit Jacked – CrossFit

Weightlifting

Back Squat (5 sets of 3 @ 78% in 20 minutes)

follow each set with 3 box jumps

Metcon

Metcon (2 Rounds for time)

9 Minute Cap

3 Rounds

24 Wall Balls 20/14

12 Toes 2 Bar

6 Power Cleans 135/95

Rest 5 Minutes then Repeat the Above

RX+ Power Cleans 185/125

record time it takes to complete each 3 round interval
– target time per round is 2 minutes

– Wall balls should be done unbroken or 2 sets minimum. Remember to breath through the motion

– Goal for T2B is unbroken. If you struggle with T2B then make sure to break them up into 2 sets sooner then later.

– Singles on Power Cleans is a safe and efficient strategy to keep you moving. Look to hit a rep every 5-8 secs

Wannabe

CrossFit Jacked – CrossFit

Metcon

Metcon (Time)

Wannabe (7,000 meters)

2000m Row easy/moderate

-Rest 1 minute-

200m Row Fast

Rest 3:00

1600m easy/moderate

-Rest 0:60-

200m fast

Rest 3:00

1200m easy/moderate

-Rest 0:60-

200m fast

-Rest 3:00-

800m moderate

-Rest 0:60-

200m fast

-Rest 3:00-

400m moderate

-Rest 0:60-

200m fast

MMMbop

CrossFit Jacked – CrossFit

Metcon

Metcon (Time)

MMMbop

Partner WOD

50 Minute Cap

1000m Row

40 Ring Muscle Ups

-rest 3:00-

1000m Row

30 Power Cleans 205/145

-rest 3:00-

1000m Row

20 Rope Climbs
substitute (scaled option)

– Ring Muscle Ups: Bar Muscle ups / Burpee C2B / Burpee Pull-ups

Opposite Day

CrossFit Jacked – CrossFit

Weightlifting

Overhead Squat (1 Single @ 85%, 2 sets of 2 @ 75% – 14 min)

record the sets of 2

Power Snatch (4 Singles @ 82% in 6 minutes)

Metcon

Metcon (Time)

Opposite Day

20 Minute Cap

30-20-10

Hang Power Snatch 95/65

Push-ups

Directly Into…

10-20-30

Hang Clean & Jerks 115/85

Burpees

RX+: Sub 21-15-9 HSPU for Push-ups. Burpees remain same.

Farmhand

CrossFit Jacked – CrossFit

Weightlifting

Clean and Jerk (3 Singles @ 72% in 8 minutes)

catch in squat

Power Clean & Push Jerk (4 Singles @ 82% of Power Clean in 10 minutes)

Metcon

Metcon (Time)

Farmhand

20 Minute Cap

5 Rounds

30 Overhead Plate Lunges 45/35

200m Single Arm Farmer Carry 50/35

30 Abmat Sit-ups

RX+: 20 Overhead Barbell Lunge 115/85
The one movement that will likely have the biggest impact on your score will be the farmers carry

urning this farmers walk into more of a farmers shuffle can take significant seconds off your final time after the 5 rounds

Hellhole

CrossFit Jacked – CrossFit

Metcon

Metcon (Time)

Hellhole

85 Single Arm Devils Press 50/35

“2-2-2-3” Intervals Style:

35 Double Unders

5 Lateral Dumbbell Burpees

Max Devil’s Press in Time Remaining

As a recap, the workout flows as follows:

AMRAP 2

Rest 2 Minutes

AMRAP 2

Rest 2 Minutes

AMRAP 2

Rest 2 Minutes

AMRAP 3

Rest 3 Minutes

then repeat cycle…
set clock to 33 minutes